People with diabetes, cognitive decline may be at higher risk for heart disease | Health

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We talk about cognitive impairment when a person has trouble remembering, learning new things, concentrating or making decisions that affect their daily life. More than 16 million people in the United States live with cognitive impairment, and age is the main risk factor.

According to a new study, people with type 2 diabetes who have cognitive impairment may be at greater risk of stroke, heart attack or death than other people with diabetes.


The findings were published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

We talk about cognitive impairment when a person has trouble remembering, learning new things, concentrating or making decisions that affect their daily life. More than 16 million people in the United States live with cognitive impairment, and age is the main risk factor. Cognitive impairment ranges from mild to severe and has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

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“Our study found that low cognitive test scores predicted heart disease in people with diabetes and other cardiac risk factors,” said co-author Hertzel C. Gerstein, MD, of McMaster University. in Hamilton, Canada. “Although the explanation for this remains unclear, proven cardiac medications should be offered to these patients to reduce their future risk of heart attack or stroke.”


Researchers assessed the relationship between cognitive function and future cardiovascular events in 8,772 people with type 2 diabetes from the REWIND trial over more than five years of follow-up. They found that people with the lowest level of cognitive function had a higher risk of heart attack and stroke than those with higher levels of cognitive function.

People with severe cognitive impairment were up to 1.6 times more likely to experience major adverse cardiovascular events and 1.8 times more likely to have a stroke or die compared to people without cognitive impairment. These results suggest that cognitive function may predict a person’s future risk of heart disease.

This story was published from a news feed with no text edits.



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